• Certified Organic: Fertilization is applied all year long by way of new soil, bat guano, and/or cow dung. Some producers make fertilizers from rice-field crabs. The use of chemicals on Kampot pepper is forbidden.
  • Kampot pepper's geographical indication designates and protects the product. It assures a particular quality, reputation, production standard and makes sure it is only grown in the specified area.
  • There are two varieties of plants used by the farmers in Kampot: Kamchay and Lampong (or Belantoeung), known locally as "big leaves" and "small leaves".
  • Replication is done by cuttings.
  • Producers of pepper in Kampot today come from several generations of pepper planters. They came back on their land after the civil war was over and started to farm pepper using traditional methods inherited from their ancestors.
  • Green pepper is harvested when still young on the vine. Kampot green pepper aromas explode on the palate with a very mild taste.
  • Kampot black pepper delivers a strong and delicate aroma. Its taste—which can range from intensely spicy to mildly sweet—reveals hints of flower, eucalyptus and mint.
  • Kampot red pepper allows for the wildest combinations, from wild meat seasoning to vanilla desserts.
  • Kampot red and white peppers are extremely rare due to the difficulty in harvesting fully mature pepper. Only a few hundred kilograms are produced each year.
  • Some pepper labeled Kampot pepper is actually mixed with the cheaper variety.
  • Following the civil war in Cambodia at the end of the 20th Century, producers and their families returned to their ancestral lands. Coming from several generations of pepper producers, they naturally cleared the land left abandoned and started cultivating pepper once again.

Source: Kampot Pepper Association